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Studies suggest association between brain injuries and stroke

Stroke and traumatic brain injuries have been linked by two separate studies, although researchers have not identified the connecting factor.

A blow to the head severe enough to affect brain function is known as a traumatic brain injury, or TBI. While many people in Virginia may associate this type of harm with headaches, memory loss or mental problems, researchers have discovered another threat to those who have suffered this trauma: stroke.

Blood vessel damage

The American Heart Association explains that the brain needs the oxygen and nutrients that are carried in the blood or its cells die. When the blood thickens into a clot in the vein, it can block the flow, and severe damage can occur quickly. This is known as an ischemic stroke. Although they did not identify a definitive cause, researchers in Taiwan speculated that there could be a link between blood vessel damage resulting from a head trauma and the clotting that leads to stroke.

According to WebMD, a study tracking more than 23,000 TBI patients revealed that those with the diagnosis were 10 times more likely to suffer a stroke within the first 90 days than those who never experienced a brain trauma. People who sustained skull fractures had the highest risk. Even five years later, the risk was still 2.3 times higher.

Personality changes

Researchers in the United States came up with a different theory, according to Medscape. This study was more in-depth because it took into account how various background elements, also known as cofounding variables, would affect the results. It included adjustments for elements such as demographics, vascular risk factors and concurrent conditions.

The strong association between TBI and ischemic stroke did not significantly change. However, scientists postulated that behavioral changes from the brain injury might be what caused a person to develop high blood pressure and other health problems known to be linked to stroke. One result that led to this conclusion was that people under the age of 50 were more likely to have a stroke after a TBI, even though this group would not normally have such a high risk.

Anyone could be the victim of a traumatic brain injury, whether from a motor vehicle crash, a slip-and-fall accident or some other source, and the medical treatment and physical impairment sustained may be extensive and long term. When the damage is caused by another person's negligent or reckless behavior, it is possible that he or she could be held liable for the pain and suffering, lost wages, lost quality of life and medical expenses. An attorney may be able to assist in ensuring that guilty parties are held accountable for their actions.

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